A Bubble Off Plumb

Make sure you vote

Posted 10/15/20

In this especially contentious election year, there is one thing on which we should all agree. Voting has never been more important than it is today.

Whether you believe things have got to change …

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A Bubble Off Plumb

Make sure you vote

Posted

In this especially contentious election year, there is one thing on which we should all agree. Voting has never been more important than it is today.

Whether you believe things have got to change or remain on the trajectory the last four years have set, unless you vote you essentially allow others to make that decision for you.

There are citizens who have legitimate concerns about their safety and health if they go out to the polls on Election Day. These could be the sick, frail or susceptible voters. There are provisions in place for them. They can absentee vote, having a ballot mailed to them. If there is any question in the voter’s mind about mailing the ballot back to the elections office, it can be returned in person to ensure it gets to the right hands.

They can vote early, at predesignated polling places and make sure they use social distancing, wear a mask, wash hands or using hand sanitizer immediately before and after touching the equipment or voting carrel. It’s essentially the same precautions used to protect one’s health when going to the doctor’s office.

There is no excuse for not voting. And it may very well have a lasting effect on the future of our republic.

What about violence at the polls or in the streets on Election Day? First, it isn’t very likely in our small towns. Second, voting is your right and privilege. Thirdly, there would be no civil rights in this nation if women, people of color or Native Americans had been dissuaded from voting by perceived or threatened violence.

Certain of our ancestors had their heads cracked, were locked in their homes or were faced with illegal and humiliating fees, tests or questioning at the polls just so that they would walk away. The same ancestors said, “No, we came to vote and we are going to demand we be allowed to do so.” Not to mention that the polls close before any results are broadcast, meaning there is time in most instances to get home before any protests begin.

There are those who will not vote and stay home because they believe their votes do not count in a so-called fly over state. The last presidential election should be proof of that fallacy. The people in those states made their voices heard and flipped the narrative going into the election.

Those who would stay home, for whatever reason, abdicate their role in the decision making process. Therefore they also lose their right to complain about the way the nation, state or district is being run. They had the opportunity to make their wishes heard and chose not to exercise it. What a sad and shameful choice. 

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