Virtual talk will trace ecological shifts in Yellowstone

Posted 12/1/20

Timing is everything, as an upcoming virtual talk will explain.

In the 1970s, legendary biologist Frank Craighead began frequent observations on the seasonal timing of ecological events in what is …

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Virtual talk will trace ecological shifts in Yellowstone

Posted

Timing is everything, as an upcoming virtual talk will explain.

In the 1970s, legendary biologist Frank Craighead began frequent observations on the seasonal timing of ecological events in what is now Grand Teton National Park — including when wildflowers sprout leaves, bud, flower and fruit. This study is known as phenology. Craighead used these notes to write the popular book, “For Everything There is a Season: The Sequence of Natural Events in the Grand Teton-Yellowstone Area.”

Nearly 50 years later, Wyoming biologist Trevor Bloom has built on this legacy to compare modern phenological events to his historic data. In a Dec. 3 lecture hosted by the Buffalo Bill Center of the West, Bloom will present the startling results of the research and share his newest short film on the project: “For Everything There Was a Season (Spring).”

The Center of the West is inviting the public to join the online lunchtime expedition, which will begin at noon on Dec. 3. Register in advance for the webinar by visiting tinyurl.com/y38xfqkg. After registering, you will receive a confirmation email with information about joining the webinar with Bloom.

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