Be ready for a fire

Fire prevention lessons important for everyone

Posted 10/7/21

Sometimes, a 911 call comes in at 3 a.m., awakening firemen from deep sleep. Sometimes, they must respond to a car accident in subzero temperatures amid a blizzard.

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Be ready for a fire

Fire prevention lessons important for everyone

Posted

Sometimes, a 911 call comes in at 3 a.m., awakening firemen from deep sleep. Sometimes, they must respond to a car accident in subzero temperatures amid a blizzard. Other times, it’s a false alarm. But every time, local firefighters respond to the calls for help.

It’s reassuring to know the Powell Volunteer Fire Department is always standing by, but we also can follow safety measures in our homes and perhaps even prevent the need to call 911 in the first place. This week marks National Fire Prevention Week, and firemen are teaching local youth about fire safety.

It can be easy to think that Fire Prevention Week is just for kids. However, as the National Fire Protection Association explains, teenagers, adults and the elderly are all at risk, making it important for everyone to learn how to stay safe in the event of a fire.

“In a fire, mere seconds can mean the difference between a safe escape and a tragedy,” the National Fire Protection Association says.

A good place to start is to ensure that your home has smoke detectors and carbon monoxide alarms — and that they’re working properly. This year’s Fire Prevention Week theme is “Learn the Sounds of Fire Safety.” When your alarm is chirping every minute or so, the battery is low and needs to be changed. If the chirping continues after new batteries are installed, it means the alarm itself must be replaced.

Take the time to check your alarms now, before the temperatures drop. And if you don’t have a carbon monoxide alarm, it’s worth getting one. Since carbon monoxide is an odorless, colorless gas, it can be difficult to know if it’s seeping into your home — and the consequences can be fatal.

If an alarm is going off in your home, get out immediately, stay outside and call 911. First responders will be there as soon as possible.

National Fire Prevention Week is also a good time to thank firemen for their service all throughout the year. Firemen willingly respond to calls at all hours, undergo rigorous training and even risk their own lives to save others.

In Powell, what makes firefighters’ dedicated service especially remarkable is that they’re volunteers. They regularly leave their homes, families and workplaces to respond to emergencies — not for a salary, but to serve their community.

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