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News

Cheaper Denver flight landed for YRA

Ticket prices for flights from Cody to Denver will be more comparable to those in Billings, and United Airlines will depart from Cody to Denver at 8 a.m. for at least the next six months under a new agreement hammered out between the Cody Yellowstone Air Improvement Resources, or CYAIR, and United Airlines.

United will provide a 50-passenger regional jet that can make the flight 30 minutes faster than the old United plane, said James Klessens, board member and CEO/president of Forward Cody.

Sugar beet replanting begins

Sugar beet growers are replanting Powell-area fields nipped by frost last week.

Heart Mountain grower Ric Rodriguez replanted some fields over the weekend after some of his beets froze earlier in the week.

Weatherford International Ltd. announced Monday that it is closing its manufacturing facility in Powell.

Some employees in the company's manufacturing division were notified Monday morning that they had been laid off. In a press release, Weatherford said it will cease operations at the facility on Alan Road by the end of October.

Painted face

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Billie Smith paints Ciara Wheatfall's face during Spring Phling festivities in downtown Powell on Friday evening. Smith, owner of Sweet Tooth Candy, joined other local merchants in the first annual event. Powell business owners also participated in West End Days on Saturday. Both weekend events featured activities for kids, food and opportunities to get acquainted with local businesses. Tribune photo by Carla Wensky

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Minnesota-based Dahlgren and Co. produces snacks and bird seed

More fields of sunflowers will raise their heads to the sun around Powell and the Big Horn Basin this year.

Dahlgren and Co., a Minnesota-based company, has written contracts with 17 growers to produce confection sunflowers for the company this year.

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Children in this Port-au-Prince, Haiti, orphanage had much more to smile about when this photo was taken a year ago. The orphanage, the House of the Children of the Lack, was leveled when a magnitude-7 earthquake shook Haiti last week. Three couples with roots in Powell have adopted daughters from the orphanage in recent years and have established a foundation, Wish for Haiti, to benefit the children still there. Courtesy photo

It's more than 2,500 miles from Powell to Port-au-Prince, Haiti, but the tragic earthquake that struck Haiti last week rocked three families with strong ties to Powell.

Leslie and Jim Christensen, Nick and Tracy Metzler and Doug and Gina Woodson have, during the last several years, all adopted girls from an orphanage in Port-au-Prince, Haiti. The adopted girls' former orphanage in Haiti, the House of the Children of the Lack, was completely destroyed in the earthquake.

$1.3 million in stimulus funds to be used for project

Homesteader Park may undergo a major facelift soon.

The city of Powell is proceeding with plans to build a new rest area, picnic structures and walking paths and to renovate the park's east-end road system, landscaping, irrigation and parking lots.

“It's effectively a new park with a rest area included,” said Sean Christensen, Powell city engineer.

$3 million sought for Eleutian move

City of Cody, Forward Cody, ask for state money to build Eleutian headquarters

Eleutian Technology and Cody officials formally unveiled plans to relocate the tech company to a new, $3.73-million facility in Cody at a Tuesday press conference.

With $3 million of state aid sought by the City of Cody, the support of the economic development group Forward Cody and contributions from Eleutian, the plan is to construct a 10,000 square foot building on property between Big Horn and Cougar avenues near Cody Middle School. The facility would be leased to Eleutian Technology.

Touring the Powell swimming pool

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During a tour of the Powell Aquatic Center, councilmen and other city leaders met with construction crews to evaluate the facility's progress. From left, Floyd Young talks with Jake Thiel and Don Hillman as Mayor Scott Mangold and Nancy Ronto discuss the project. Tribune photo by Carla Wensky

Early 2010 opening slated for $9.2 million aquatic facility

With sunlight pouring through an open roof, city leaders toured the Powell Aquatic Center last week. They were welcomed by Sletten Construction crews, concrete vessels nearly ready for swimmers and good news: Construction is on track for an early 2010 opening.

As big-box stores have encroached on small Wyoming towns, “buy local” has become a mantra for people who want to see independent businesses survive in their communities. It's an important goal, one that is essential to the survival of small businesses, especially in a struggling economy.

A column in Sunday's Billings Gazette spotlighted a Minnesota woman's campaign to help people make that conscious effort to shop at home. The woman, business consultant Cinda Baxter, developed a relatively-simple idea that is catching on nation-wide: The 3/50 Project. The idea is for shoppers to identify the three local businesses they would most hate to see close. The shoppers then set a goal of spending $50 per month among the three stores. Theoretically, because everyone's needs and shopping patterns are different, customer dollars would be spread among a variety of businesses.

A gallon of paint at the downtown hardware store, a $15 birthday present and a card at a Main Street shop, a new CD from the music store down the street — and the monthly goal is met, right here in Powell.

The 3/50 Project gives shoppers a concrete way to approach buying locally, and the impact can be huge.

According to the 3/50 Project Web site (www.the350project.net), if just half the working people in the nation followed the plan, they would boost annual small-business sales by $43 billion. And, for every $100 spent in independent businesses, $68 stays in the community, compared to just $43 in national chain stores.

The numbers are compelling and show how the little things truly do add up. It's a method small-town Wyoming shoppers can use to help ensure the “mom and pop stores” we rely on don't become a thing of the past.

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