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This is Homecoming week at Powell High School. Did you enjoy high school?




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Tessa Schweigert

After 40 years of nurturing local economic development through land sales, Target Powell Valley is coming to an end.

“Target Powell Valley just ran out of money. The bank had to do something, and Target Powell Valley had to do something, too,” said Dick Nelson, chairman of the First National Bank and Trust Board.

In the early 1970s, a small group of volunteers started Powell’s first industrial park through a budding organization they named Target Powell Valley.

Over the next 40 years, the nonprofit’s dedicated volunteers furthered economic development in the Powell area by securing land, developing infrastructure and making lots available at a reasonable price to new or expanding businesses.

City makes its case, area residents concerned

Facing closure of the Powell landfill next year, city officials plan to build a transfer station instead of hauling trash directly to Cody on a daily basis. But area residents neighboring a proposed site east of Powell questioned and criticized the city’s plan Tuesday night.

After tossing out the trash, most residents give little thought to what happens with their garbage.

That’s not the case with local and county leaders, who have spent countless hours over recent years thinking, discussing, and at times, arguing about what happens with trash in our region’s landfills.

Local leaders, legislators discuss budget

This week, state legislators will work through Wyoming’s supplemental budget bill, deciding, among other things, how much money to provide for local governments.

The budget bill, crafted by the Joint Appropriations Committee, recommends several critical departures from the draft budget Gov. Matt Mead proposed last month. Notably, the JAC’s budget fails to endorse the governor’s call to create a permanent stream of funding for local governments.

This week will give local governments a better picture of what their funding looks like in the supplemental budget.

As in previous years, the Legislature will provide a snapshot of funding for the immediate future — but what Wyoming’s cities and towns need is a forecast of what to expect down the road.

After a string of delays over several months, the new Homesteader rest area at Powell’s east entrance is slated to open next week.

Part of a $2 million renovation project encompassing 10 acres of Homesteader Park, the glass-enclosed rest area is nearing substantial completion, said City Administrator Zane Logan on Monday. The project is funded largely through federal stimulus money, as well as funds from the city and state.

February 08, 2011 8:49 am

Renovated Powell Branch Library opens

Turning over a new leaf

Walking into the freshly remodeled Powell Branch Library Monday morning, Sandy McGee’s eyes widened as she exclaimed, “Wow, it looks so much bigger!”

The library was closed for the past month as crews renovated the building, installing new carpet and repainting the interior. As patrons discovered Monday morning, however, the library’s new look is much more than carpet and paint.

Traditionally, readers are encouraged to look beyond first appearances — to not judge a book by its cover. This week, however, will be all about first appearances for local readers as they see their newly remodeled Powell Branch Library.

The library was closed to the public for the month of January and the first days of February as it underwent extensive remodeling. On Monday morning, the library reopened its doors, showing off an updated layout, new carpet, fresh paint and added features. The library is now compliant with the Americans with Disabilities Act, making it accessible for all residents.

Powell prides itself on being a safe community — the kind where kids can ride their bikes freely around town and neighbors look out for one another.

Contrary to a popular local belief, however, Powell is not a place where it’s OK to leave your front door unlocked or the keys in your vehicle.